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the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however,
for that. tavis: the fact that we are disinterested in science, as expressed by the under- performing grades of our students in science classes, what is behind that? is it possible to arrest that development? >> there is a concern up and down the chain in the country, and part of it is, yes, we have to get people interested in science from a young age. i get questions from seven-year- olds, which is really exciting. it turns out that people are signing up to be engineering and science majors, but by the time they have graduated, they have dropped. why? what is going on? is it too hard? there is a lot of studying going on there. tavis: this belief, my word, not yours, but this does belief that many americans have one science tells us -- but this disbelief that many americans have on science -- what is behind this abiding disbelief? >> i happen to believe is a matter of not watching enough science television. tavis: [laughs] >> it is where you live. it is who is doing the teaching. is it really that important? yes. science is research. science is innovation. it is our ticket to every bu
the various instruments are going to be used. science teams working together for five or ten years or more interpret the data that returns and discuss which of the engineers what is interesting and possible to do next. so, at its heart the story of the planetary exploration today is about the relation of people and robotic spacecraft. machines never actually complex laboratory capable of operating in extreme cold with little power package to handle the vibrations and worked for years without repair. sending the scientific instruments throughout the solar system is one of the great successes of the computer age, and there will surely marked our place in history and science and exploration but these missions also show that we understand how to design machines and organize people so everything fits and that's my story today about the exploration rovers how the design of the spacecraft as you see mer, the organization of people, the software tools and the schedule makes it possible for scientists to work on mars. in the skill of the universe, mars is next door about nine months travel using co
system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. i
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
science. >> science? >> science is going to get the girls? that's it. >> yeah. >> this is from our friend at household hacker. >> let's turn whiskey. >> water. well sort of. >> why? >> to impress the ladies. already told you. >> i'll do anything. we start with two shot glasses. you fill one to the brim with water, one to the brim with whiskey. and then here comes the tricky part. take a piece of paper or card board and put it over the water or shot glass, flip it over, the glass on top of the whiskey shot glass. >> slowly move the card a bit in and open up the small slit between the glasses. >> there could be some trickle down from the water to the whiskey. >> this is going to be a density experiment that's going to blow your mind. >> all right. >> see what's happening. >> the water is going down into the whiskey. >> and the whiskey goes up where the water was. that's why this is a density experiment. >> see, the water is heavier than the alcohol so it sinks to the bottom of the two glasses. in the process, it displaces the whiskey and forces it up to the top. >> by the end of the trick h
will give me a chance to have a mini "west wing" reunion. and a member of the science commit me who thinks science is aloif from the pit of hell. and he thinks he's a scientist. also tonight steve mor continue -- martin decided to do his political commercial, one of those guys, steve martin or bob kerrey will join me to explain why steve did that. ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> coming up, mitt romney tried to play a moderate at the debate last week. this week, paul rien's going to give it a shot. he's never played that part before. ryan versus biden is next. former nebraska senator bob kerrey will talk about his race to get back into the senate and how he talked steve martin in to helping him. a republican congress man says the bible teaches us all about society. that's coming up. [ dog 1 ] i am not a vegetarian! yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add pl
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
, the rogue's gallery of republicans who don't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and it's membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td amerit
will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early
during the george w. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. wh exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the o
think he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds be
't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and its membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab etfs. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 schwab etfs now have the lowest
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
the senate until the kink of junk science opened his month. with the senate in the balance, let's talk about favorite senate races and surely what's going on in missouri never ceases to amuse me. the crazy uncle has been let out of the back room and into the party. he keeps talking and he keeps staying alive. he's only 3 points behind. missourians are saying we don't like either people. who do we like least, best, bad, worse. it's problematic both ways, but the gop has refunded to todd akin to supporting him, newt gingrich has endorsed him, rick santor santorum, i believe you like him, too. >> i do. >> they both endorse him. it seems that the gop once running from todd akin has said winning the senate at all costs is valuable. >> some in the gop, some. >> it's interesting, you know. missouri there's a mirror image situation in massachusetts. missouri is a red state that doesn't really like the republican candidate personally. you look at massachusetts, and another key senate race. this is a blue state that really likes the republican person, scott brown, whose re-election is critical to taki
parties."but mileah kromer...who is a political science professor at goucher pollege....says independent vottrs...are still sending a message.(kromer) "what they hhpeeii for a third party candidate, is to rrn and get their ideas out there, ttat hoppfully their ideas will be aaopted by one of the major party candidates."" (mitchell) "i vote for democrats at times, i vote for republicans at times."and according to ""-4"...that hould be the principle...of any p5 news at ttn. n ryyell,,foxx - more ttan 377thouuaad marylanders are registered with the green, libertariin or coming up in our 6 o'cloock hour... a smmll stowaway... gives a beltsville man trouble on the road. road.the strange sight he found... ffer popping the hood. oriolee closer jim johnson comes through for the ttam.thee game winning performance he gave... in the 9tt. ((break 3)) 3 3 the orioles fann patieece second time in two days, the start of the home playoff ggme orioles get their firstthome but it wwsn't easy. wei-yii chen was great, but in the first inning he watched with all of us, one of the weirrdst plays ou'll ever
this message. this is "jeopardy!" introducing today's contestants -- a graduate student of library science from chillicothe, ohio...
a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. the last 16, and fanatical and
an idea of how massive this balloon is. as far as the science, ashleigh, yes, what they're trying to see is just what the human body does when it travels the speed of sound. if the speed of sound has any affect on the body when it's just traveling in a spacesuit, that's never been done before. felix baum na felix baumgartner is about to do this. another thing they will mesh is how this high pressure suit holds up. if it does hold up and is not compromised in any way, this could be the next generation of spacesuit. those are the technological advances they hope to be able to make here with this mission. you know, just a few months ago i talked to felix baumgartner about this and with all of its inherent risks, and there are many, i asked him a key question, is he afraid of dying on this mission. take a listen. >> well, dying has always been part of my life. as a bait jumper you always face death on every base jump and so it's important you do your homework because you need confidence. you have to have confidence in your team and your skills and yourself and you always hope that you're not
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
, there is hope for an effective treatment. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. so the community is very excited about the results of this trial >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early
growth and in our history. the next is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two years in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to be at 73% and this was similar to what we saw in [inaudible]. as i said the third lens by w
will share the award with haroche of france. the rile academy of sciences says they opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics. >>> a look at the weather and see where that rain is out there. >> depends on where you are it could be anywhere with it being closest to the coast that would be a better area to see scattered light showers during morning hours. let's look at what is going on the embarcadero san francisco back to the bay bridge looks quiet. live doppler 7 hd, this is what it looks like right now and let me flatten this out a little, as i do, you will be able to see how close it is to the coast. about 17 mile there is as we head toward -- 15 to 17 miles -- we'll put it into motion, it is dissipating as it heads north, the chunk of low pressure starting to move more towards northwest which means good sign that most of this activity is going to stay well out over the ocean. don't be surprised if a spray sprinkle or two gets along the sonoma marin county coast this morning. we are running in the 40s napa, santa rosa everybody else in the 50s. thick fog north bay valleys. mo
-- nobel prize in physics. he is originally from sacramento and received a bachelor of science from uc berkeley. he's now a physicist at the university of colorado in boulder. both judges credit them for inventing ground-breaking methods to observe the properties of quantum parols while preserving their quantum properties. >>> ahead closer look at why investors are feeling down on wall street. >>> and what happened late this morning for an amazing jump from the edge of space. >>> stocks are down after global economic growth and poor expectations for corporate earnings seasons with kicks off after the closing bell. dow down 98, nasdaq down 45, s&p down 12. >>> high winds today derailed plans for an man to launch a death defying 23-mile free fall in new mexico. former military parachutist baumgartner is on a quest to become the first sky diver to break the sound barrier. he planned to ride a capsule carried bay balloon into the stats fear then jump. but the balloon is so delicate it can only take flight of winds of two miles an hour or less. the 43-year-old now says he will try again. >>
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
today and i checked at the inner harbor near the maryland science center. a rain delay for some light rain showers. just over 25 inches for the year and we're running a deficit of over 7 inches. the high today, 15 degrees below the average of 69. the record low below freezing in 2001. it is chilly and 53 at the inner harbor. at the eastern shore, temperatures are cool. we're running into the low 50's. there you see the cold producing this out today in the mountains. 34 in oakland. there are freeze warnings in effect for the western sliver of allegheny county and into the mountains of west virginia. we will stay here, mainly cloudy and a chance of a brief sprinkle. this weather disturbances in the upper levels of the atmosphere. it is moving east and it will take the showers offshore. we may get a break for two in the clouds before the next front roles in wednesday afternoon. there will be important for the orioles heading of i-95 to new york. a few breaks in the cloud cover. temperatures will recover. here comes the next front and there are some showers in the catskills west of new yo
a statement for us. so we'd love to here it. >> yes. >> i'm a retired librarian with a ba in political science from new york oust and a masters from peabody. i was born in new york city in 1919, moved to maryland 51 years ago. i have two daughters and two grandchildren. i've been active in piece and other forward looking organizations all my life. the drone part has four posts, nonviolence, environmental and west dom, social justice, grass roots democracy. violence is an inherently self-defeating policy. the u.s. seems to be waging war without end. we have troops in 150 countries. i say prink all the troops -- bring all the troops home within a year. not ri lens action aligns peaceful means with peaceful ends. my own friend dean sharp on the faculty of harvard wrote this and many other books on nonviolence. even some military officials agree with dpoan that nonviolence is practical and replace some military projects. the cost of military hardware is terrific. the cost ofen in violent message is negligible. mccarty wrote i'd rather teach peace and several other books. he has initiated successfu
, if you're watching us on kark 4 news in little rock, arkansas, learn how math and science make things like video games and roller coaster possible at design zone. at the museum of discovery. >>> thank you so much. now here is an early look at your entertainment headlines. one of hollywood's most enduring couples are calling it quits. kind of surprised about this. danny da veto and ray a perelman have separated after 30 years of marriage according to a rep. the two met in 1970. they have three children all in their 20s. no word on what caused the split. >> do you remember the show "taxi?" >> of course. katy perry went all out with her performance complete with a special manicure that featured photos of the president and a democrat donkey. there you go. getting creative. >>> first justin bieber, now lady gaga. she got sick not once but four times on stage. and she kept on singing and dancing. >> wow. >> i want my money back. reports say gaga's been battling the flu. there you go. >>> finally, last night david blaine ended what he now says is his final endurance stunt. the illusionists w
meets rube goldberg meets weird science project. >> what does this thing ultimately do? >> jason is a huge photography and film man. >> oh. >> that's awesome. >> i want to be a part of one of these things. can we build something like this here in the studio. >>> ladies, this is the type of thing i used to dream about when i was a kid. taking a super fast go-cart and racing it through the hallways of the mall. they are in a pair of electric go-carts. the mall has been shut down for them. they do a pit stop here, grab drinks and off racing through the mall they go. right? >> this is awesome. you're right, this is like every kid's dream. >> i bet this extra fun because the mall floor is slick. taking a turn, slide out and spin. >> and turf the tires. >> this is at the destiny usa mall in syracuse, new york. these are a few of the pole position cars at go-cart raceway inside the mall. the two guys racing. >> that's the way to drive to work in the morning. >> the owners bob and bruce, they own destinies usa. >> they're grandpas. >> they are. >> grandpa racing this thing. >> those two
we could work on our science project then. - well, what if i took you toe pri too kentucky fried chicken afterward?rd ? and then we'll go to target, and i'll buy you a mega-ranger.ng. co - could i perhaps have two mega-rangers? - yes, darling, you can have whatever you wantn [dramatic opera music]( omi captioning by captionmax www.captionmax.comible by >> october 8, 2012. from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: welcome to the daily show. my name is jon stewart. great show for you tonight. our guest tonight legendary guitarist pete townsend will be joining us. ( cheers and applause ) one of my all-time heroes. quick story fallout from the rumble on saturday night. obviously other than for people who couldn't download it, i apologize for that. it turns out the internet is a series of tubes. if you stuff too much in one tube, it won't... but it turns out my kids watched and apparently the phrase "bull [bleep] mountain" was awfully popular with my son who is eight years old. apparently not a
that you, i'm to the going to say mad scientist, i'm going to si highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is
oh, we're coming to get you. this dude is on the committee of science and technology. as would say he's from the tech-mology committee. and you know who else is on that committee? todd akin. all these guys from congress, i got t this is a good one. this is when lucifer burned the dinosaur bones. let's put the dumbest guys on the science and technology committee. if you think that's bad we're just warming up. a book with letters to the edit editor. the constitution of slavery to the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people. may actually have been a blessing in disguise. the blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would some day be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the earth. oh, i don't know why i didn't see it that way? it's a blessing in disguise. why don't you be my slave, and you do all my work. if you don't i'll whip you. does that sound like a blessing in disguise? and how hot is your wife? i might want to have sex with her. and what about your daughters. should have i sex with them befor
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